Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.

Infoceans
The Quebec Region Bulletin
Volume 11– Number 4 – August - September 2008



Appointment of the Regional Director, Oceans, Habitat and Species at Risk, Quebec Region
Picture - Gordon Walsh

On June 20, Fisheries and Oceans Canada announced the appointment of Gordon Walsh as Director General, Oceans, Habitat and Species at Risk.

Gordon Walsh has a BA in biology and an MA in aquatic ecology from Laval University in the City of Québec. He began his career in 1987 at Fisheries and Oceans Canada as a biologist in the Fish Habitat Division before taking the position of Section Head, Fish Habitat Division, and then Section Head, Marine Environment Assessment and Evaluation Section. He was promoted to Director, Fish Habitat Management, in 1996, a position that he held until his most recent appointment.

With more than 20 years of experience at Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Gordon Walsh has acquired considerable expertise in the management and implementation of a variety of programs related to aquatic habitat studies, environmental impact assessment, fish habitat protection and conservation, integrated management, protected marine areas and information management.

“I am convinced that a more judicious use of aquatic habitats is one of the greatest challenges we must meet if we want to preserve the integrity of productive aquatic habitats and make them accessible for future generations.”

“The protection of resources and the integrated management of uses are essential. I believe it is important to increase the participation and co-operation of people, communities and other players involved in the conservation of the ecological diversity and health of coastal ecosystems, while encouraging initiatives that could benefit both the aquatic environment and the economy.”

“With the support of my team at the Oceans, Habitat and Species at Risk Branch, I hope to help maintain productive and healthy aquatic ecosystems, and in so doing, the ongoing economic activities that are crucial to communities.”

Back

 

Proposed Amendment to Section 17 of the Atlantic Fishery Regulations, 1985

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is proposing an amendment to section 17 of the Atlantic Fishery Regulations, 1985 which will provide flexibility in payment methods for multi-year licences.  The proposed amendment will not impact current licence fees.

The purpose of the proposed amendment is to autho-rize, in regulation, the payment of licence fees for multi-year licences by installments, consistent with the Interest and Administrative Charges Regulations under the Financial Administration Act and relevant Treasury Board Policies. 

This amendment is intended to come into force by the end of 2008.

If you would like to provide comments on this regulatory proposal, please send your comments to Dave.Luck@dfo-mpo.gc.ca or 613-990-0199 by September 12, 2008

The Atlantic Fishery Regulations, 1985 can be viewed at the following web site: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/F-14/SOR-86-21/index.html.

Back

 

New Science Advisory Reports on the Internet

The following science advisory reports are now available on the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat’s Internet site, in the “Publications” section, 2008 series: www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas

• Advice on the stock definition of redfish (Sebastes fasciatus and S. mentella) in Units 1 and 2 (2008/026)

• Assessment of the estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence (divisions 4RST) capelin stock (2008/037)

• Assessment of the Atlantic Mackerel stock for the Northwest (4RST) Atlantic (Subareas 3 and 4) in 2007 (2008/041)

Back

 

Convictions for Fisheries Act Violations

By Martin Bourget

Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Quebec Region, has released the names of fishermen who have received fines for violations of the Fisheries Act. DFO continues to strictly enforce its zero tolerance policy on violations of the Fisheries Act. The Department has a mandate to protect and conserve fishery resources and is ever vigilant in its efforts to prevent poaching of marine resources.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada encourages the public to report poaching incidents by calling 1-800-463-9057 . All calls are confidential.

Offender

Home

Offence

Sentencing date and fine

Judge

Lucien Lebel

Port-Cartier

Permitting unauthorized use of own fishing gear.

May 6, 2008
$300

Louise Gallant

Uren Etheridge

Brador Bay

Fishing for snow crab without a licence.

May 21, 2008
$300

Michel Dionne

Samuel Hobbs

Brador Bay

Fishing for snow crab without a licence.

May 21, 2008
$300

Michel Dionne

Jean-Richard Joncas

Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon

Breaching of conditions of scallop fishing licence by fishing in an unauthorized area on July 7, 2005

Breaching of conditions of scallop fishing licence by fishing in an unauthorized area on July 27, 2005 .

May 21, 2008
$1,000

 


May 21, 2008
$489 + forfeiture of seized scallops having a value of $511

Michel Dionne

 

 



Michel Dionne

Riley Lavallée

Blanc-Sablon

Breaching of conditions of turbot fishing licence in 2007 by retaining Atlantic halibut smaller than the legal size of 81 cm.

May 21, 2008
$750

Michel Dionne

Peter Wellman

Old Fort Bay

Possession of four lobster smaller than the legal size of 82 mm.

May 21, 2008
$500

Michel Dionne

Albert Corey

Port-Cartier

Using commercial fishing gear for fishing without the licence holder’s authorization.

May 22, 2008
$250

François Kouli

Richard Organ

Mutton Bay

Breaching of conditions of lumpfish licence in 2007 by fishing with nets with a mesh size smaller than 267 mm.

May 22, 2008
$500

Michel Dionne

Christopher Roberts

Harrington Harbour

Breaching of conditions of cod fishing licence in 2006 by exceeding daily quota of 1,522 pounds.

 

Breaching of conditions of cod fishing licence in 2006 exceeding daily quota of 535 pounds.

May 22, 2008
$750

 





May 22, 2008
$250

Michel Dionne

 

 




Michel Dionne

Fernand Hautcoeur

Sainte-Thérèse-de-Gaspé

Lending the boat to a person who is not authorized to fish.

June 2, 2008
$1,500

Luc Marchildon

Roger Pinel

Grande-Rivière

Lending the boat to a person who is not authorized to fish.

June 2, 2008
$1,500

Luc Marchildon

Albert Corbey

Port-Cartier

Using fishing gear without a permit.

June 5, 2008
$250

Michel Parent

Bertrand Bénard

Fatima

Fishing lobster and rock crab without a licence.
Possession of lobster that were smaller than the legal size.

June 11, 2008
$600
+ 90 days of community service

Michel Dionne

Jean-Yves Blais

Chandler

Fishing for lobster without a licence.
Fishing during closed season.

Possession of undersized lobsters.

June 16, 2008
$3,000 + 3 years’ probation (prohibited from being on the
Chandler and Newport wharves, ordered to keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

Lucie Morissette

Pierrot Bouchard

Longue-Pointe-de-Mingan

Clam harvesting in a closed area.

June 17, 2008
$200

Louise Gallant

Marc Couture

Percé

Refusing to allow an observer to carry out duties aboard the vessel.

June 17, 2008
$1,500

Lucie Morissette

Marcel Bond

Longue-Pointe-de-Mingan

Fishing for rock crab with untagged traps.

June 18, 2008
$1,750

Michel Parent

Arnaud Landry

Havre-Saint-Pierre

Removing crab without it being weighed.

June 18, 2008
$1,000

Michel Parent

Guy Maloney

Mingan

Fishing for crab during a closed time.

June 18, 2008
$1,000

Michel Parent

Bruno Pelletier

Colombier

Harvesting more than the allowable daily limit of 300 softshell clams while sport fishing.

June 19, 2008
$200

Louise Gallant

Back

 

2008: a Banner Spawning Year for Capelin!

By Sylvi Racine

The 2008 capelin spawning season has barely ended and already the Capelin Observers Network (CON) is declaring it a success.

Highlights

The 2008 season is the second best recorded by the CON, after the 2007 season, when 175 observations were made. This year, 48 observers reported a total of 136 spawning events at 62 different locations.

A number of new spawning sites were recorded in 2008. Capelin were observed for the first time on the beaches in St. Flavie and Métis sur Mer on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, and at Kégaska on the North Shore. The first report of spawning came from Cap de l’Hôpital in Fatima, Magdalen Islands. As in previous years, the capelin that rolled on the beaches east and west of the Brochu River in Gallix (Sept Îles) gave rise to the most reports (34).

Efforts to track capelin spawning events on the North Shore were initiated in 2002 after capelin was recognized as a key species in the St. Lawrence ecosystem. In 2003, the ZIP (areas of prime concern) committees and the integrated coastal zone ma-nagement committees, supported by Fisheries and Oceans Canada, created the Capelin Observers Network. The CON’s main objective is to identify capelin spawning sites and the dates on which they spawn. The Network is also an excellent tool for promoting community awareness of and involvement in protecting the species’ habitat. With the capelin data gathered, Fisheries and Oceans Canada is able to issue recommendations for the management of the coastal zone and the St. Lawrence ecosystem.

Back

 

Marine Search and Rescue: It's not a Job. It's and Adventure.

By Simon-Pierre Goulet

Picture - Mathieu Vachon, Hubert Desgagnés and Daniel Tremblay - specialists SAR officers in Quebec.

Each year in Quebec, the Search and Rescue Centre of the Canadian Coast Guard responds to an average of 1,300 marine incident calls and comes to the assistance of nearly 3,000 souls.  This represents an increase of more than 15% over the last ten years.

In this field, Quebec is fortunate in having on its strength three pioneers.  With the longest service record in search and rescue (SAR) co-ordination in Canada, Mathieu Vachon, retired, Hubert Desgagnés and Daniel Tremblay (left to right) have become the first specialist SAR officers in Quebec.

The techniques used today differ little from those of yore.  However, the adoption of improved working tools, such as computers and satellite tracking systems, and especially cell phones and 911 emergency call centres, have supplemented VHF radio.  Conventional tools, such as marine charts, have been upgraded, shortening search and rescue response times.

Even with better working tools, nothing can replace the skills of experienced officers like Mssrs. Vachon, Desgagnés and Tremblay.

Key Dates

1947:  The Royal Canadian Air Force is officially assigned responsibility for search and rescue (SAR) operations for aircraft in distress in Canada.  Opening of Rescue Co-ordination Centres in Halifax , Torbay (NFL), Edmonton , and Victoria ; Trenton opened a little later.

 

1951: The Air Force’s mandate is extended to ships in distress.

 

1960: A marine advisor from the Coast Guard is assigned to each Rescue Co-ordination Centre. 

 

1970: The Torbay centre closes and the Halifax centre is mandated to serve eastern Canada. The Trenton centre serves Ontario and part of Quebec.  The Edmonton centre covers the Prairies and Arctic, while the Victoria centre serves the Pacific.

 

1977: Two Emergency Search and Rescue Centres operated by the Canadian Coast Guard are authorized in St John’s and the City of Québec (the name was changed to Marine Rescue Service Centres in 1998).

 

July 4, 1978 : First permanent search and rescue co-ordinators appointed to the City of Québec Emergency Search and Rescue Centre.

 

Logo - Carreer

Back

 

Reporting Poaching Incidents is Important
Picture - Report poaching

Fisheries and Oceans Canada wants to raise awareness among the people living in the North Shore, Lower St. Lawrence, Gaspé and Magdalen Islands regions about the importance of marine resources. The Department is also counting on the public’s co-operation to counter poaching activities.

The poaching of marine resources in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada has a significant impact on fish, crustacean and mollusk species. As a result, it poses a threat to the future of commercial and recreational fishing and the livelihood of many people working in the fishing industry.

Marine resources constitute public property that we must all strive to protect. For this reason, we are encouraging people to report any poaching activities by calling 1 800 463-9057 . All calls are confidential.

Back

 

Investigation Into Capsizing of l'Acadien II Continues

The report of Transportation Safety Board (TSB) into the capsizing and subsequent sinking on March 26 of the L'Acadien II should be available for public release later in the fall.

The TSB investigation also ga-thered electronic information from chart systems aboard the Sir William Alexander, and recordings of telecommunications from Marine Communications and Traffic Services in Sydney and Port aux Basques, and information from the Canadian Coast Guard as well as the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Halifax.

Two separate sets of post-occurrence sea trials  were done to simulate the actual towing arrangements as accurately as possible to better understand the interaction between the two vessels and the dynamics of the capsize.

The Transportation Safety Board is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

Back

 

Recreational Groundfish Fishery in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Quebec Region, wishes to inform the details of the 2008 Recreational Groundfish Fishery in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

The hand line recreational groundfish fishery does not require a licence. DFO will closely monitor fishing activities and the catch rates to estimate removals. Any abuse of the management measures will result in a review of the closure dates and potential early closures to fishery areas. The public is reminded to follow safe boating practices when fishing. For more information, contact a Fisheries Officer at your local DFO office.

Back

 

Ban on Trade of Seal Products: Canada Will Review the Proposition

The federal government - along with our provincial and territorial governments and sealing industry leaders - will be reviewing how the proposed regulations and any exemptions would apply to Canada. Canada expects the European Union to quickly begin discussions on the conditions for exemption from the draft regulations so that any trade restriction would have no impact on market access for products from Canada’s humane, regulated and responsible hunt.

Back

 

When Harvesting Shellfish, don't Forget to Check that the Area is Open!

For more information on the status of shellfish beds (open and closed areas), you can consult the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program’s Web site at www.mollusca.gc.ca

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is advising the public that shellfish harvesting is prohibited in closed areas or in areas located within 200 metres of a wharf, due to the risk of contamination. Eating contaminated shellfish is dangerous and may lead to paralysis and even death.

This program is managed by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada. You can also find the latest information on shellfish harvesting by calling one of the following numbers:

CHARLEVOIX, NORTH SHORE AND ANTICOSTI   ISLAND
From Ile-aux-Coudres to Baie-Trinité : (800) 463-8558
From Baie-Trinité to Blanc-Sablon : (800) 463-1736  

MAGDALEN ISLANDS : 418-986-388

LOWER ST. LAWRENCE AND GASPE
From Saint-Roch-des-Aulnaies to Cap Gaspé:
(800) 463-0607
From Cap Gaspé to the Matapédia River:
(800) 463-4204

Back

Infoceans

August - September 2008
Volume 11
Number 4

Published by:
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Quebec Region
Communications Branch
104, Dalhousie St.
Quebec (Québec)  G1K 7Y7
Telephone: (418) 648-7747

Director:
Caroline Hilt

Editor:
Viviane Haeberlé

Visual Coordinator:
Denis Chamard