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THE QUEBEC REGION BULLETIN
FEBRUARY - MARCH 2012/VOLUME 15/NUMBER 1
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ST. LAWRENCE RIVERBED REVEALED
IN THE PORT OF QUÉBEC
Hydrographers S. Paquet, D. Boudreault and R. Côté Hydrographers Stéphane Paquet, Diane Boudreault and Roger Côté on the CCGS Frederick G. Creed.
Patrick Hally

In 2010, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, through the Canadian Hydrographic Service, conducted hydrographic surveys to update data on the water depth of the St. Lawrence River in the Québec area. The images revealed interesting topographic and geographic features. Notably, the surveys uncovered debris from the old Québec bridges that collapsed in 1907 and 1916, as well as a number of shipwrecks, some of which have yet to be identified.

The surveys were conducted aboard the CCGS Frederick G. Creed. The catamaran, unique in Canada, is equipped with a multibeam echosounder and high-precision positioning systems that are used to conduct the extremely precise bathymetric surveys (depth and bottom topography with full seabed coverage) needed to keep waterways safe and accessible.

One of the newly located shipwrecks is that of the Lady Grey, an old canadian icebreaker that sank in 1955. The wreck lies approximately halfway between Cap Diamant and Pointe du Bout de l’Île at Sainte-Pétronille on Île d’Orléans. It is about 56 metres long and 8 metres wide and lies at a depth of approximately 41 metres. Its structure extends about 12 metres above the seabed.

Acoustic image of the Lady Grey wreck
Acoustic image of the Lady Grey wreck
DFO

Another impressive shipwreck, approximately 69 metres long, was found slightly downstream of the Port of Québec. All of the shipwrecks, whether identified or not, were reported to Transport Canada’s Receiver of Wreck.


Richard Sanfaçon
Science
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