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THE QUEBEC REGION BULLETIN
APRIL - MAY 2009/VOLUME 12/NUMBER 2
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Through the Species at Risk Coordination Espèces en Péril (SARCEP) program pursuant to the Species at Risk Act, Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s North Shore Sector works to raise the awareness of fishers about protecting species at risk.

We would like to thank Jean-François Beaudoin of Blanc-Sablon who, during the 2008 fishing season, freed a leatherback turtle from his net. This turtle, an endangered species, was spotted again in the same area for a few days following its release.

Beaudoin recorded the incidental catch in his species at risk logbook for the 2008 season. Because he took the trouble to write down this information, specialists were able to conduct a follow-up and compile very valuable data on the leatherback turtle.

Thanks go to all the fishers who help protect aquatic species at risk… one turtle at a time!

Mona Rochette
North Shore Area

Mamilossa MPO P. DIONNE
MPO P. DIONNE
THE MAMILOSSA
IS ON ITS WAY!

Last March 5, the Canadian Coast Guard took possession of a new air cushion vehicle (ACV), the CCGS Mamilossa. Built in England, the Mamilossa will be based in Trois-Rivières and will replace the CCGS Waban Aki, an air cushion vehicle built in 1987.

The Mamilossa will be used for icebreaking on rivers, the foreshore flats of the St. Lawrence and places that are hard for conventional icebreakers to reach. This hovercraft, with a heavy-duty crane and engine, can take on and off load larger buoys. It can also carry rolling stock since it is equipped with a ramp that provides direct access to the loading deck. This latter characteristic makes it particularly effective during pollution clean-up operations. In addition, the Mamilossa can be used for search and rescue missions.

The Abenaki word mamilossa means “he who goes from water to land” and is pronounced maw-may-loas-saw.



USE CAUTION
WHEN EATING SHELLFISH

Fisheries and Oceans Canada wishes to inform the public of the health hazards of eating shellfish taken from closed areas. Eating contaminated shellfish is dangerous and may lead to paralysis and even death.

Shellfish harvesting is prohibited in closed areas. In addition, shellfish harvesting is prohibited within 125 metres of a wharf, due to the risk of contamination.

To protect public health, Fisheries and Oceans Canada is ever vigilant in its efforts to prevent shellfish harvesting in closed areas. It is also asking the public to report poaching incidents by calling 1-800-463-9057. All calls are confidential.



FISHERIES MANAGEMENT PLANS
ON THE INTERNET

The most recent fishing management plans are now available on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Internet site, www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca, in the Highlights section, under Fisheries Management Decisions.

You will find information on species, where they are found (region/area), opening and closing dates for the season, total allowable catches, and management plans. This section is updated on an ongoing basis.