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Bibliography of the Maurice Lamontagne Institute

Gary D. WOHLGESCHAFFEN

LEE, K., S.E. COBANLI, J. GAUTHIER, S. ST-PIERRE, G.H. TREMBLAY, G.D. WOHLGESCHAFFEN, 2005. Evaluating the addition of fine particles to enhance oil degradation. Pages 2699-2704 in 2005 International Oil Spill Conference: prevention, preparedness, response, and restoration, Miami Beach, Florida, May 15-19, 2005 .

Natural biodegradation rates of oil within the marine environment are partly controlled by surface availability, as microbial attack primarily occurs at the oilwater interface. Therefore, increasing the surface area of residual oil by the addition of fine oleophilic particles may prove to be an effective bioremediation strategy. Considering commercial availability and cost, heat-treated peat was identified to be a promising particle source as it has high oil absorption properties and does not compete with oil as an alternative carbon source to oil-degrading bacteria. A preliminary laboratory experiment conducted with a respirometry system demonstrated the feasibility of nutrient and peat additions to enhance the metabolic activity of bacteria within oil-contaminated sand beach sediments. Field trials were conducted with similar peat and nutrient concentrations in a north-temperate beach environment with weathered Scotian Light crude oil over a 138-day period. The rates of microbial respiration and productivity were enhanced significantly above unoiled and oiled control sediments with the addition of inorganic nutrients with and without peat amendments. Treatment of sediments with inorganic nutrients and peat did not increase the toxicity of the residual oil. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis was used to quantify bioremediation success by normalizing the loss of individual components to the conserved marker 17α(H), 21β(H)-hopane. While there is evidence of a stimulatory effect with the addition of peat, results suggest that nutrient availability in the interstitial water limited optimal rates of oil bioremediation.©2005 American Petroleum Institute

LEE, K., G.D. WOHLGESCHAFFEN, G.H. TREMBLAY, J.H. VANDERMEULEN, D.C. MOSSMAN, K.G. DOE, P.M. JACKMAN, J.E.H. WILSON, R.C. PRINCE, R.M. GARRETT, C.E. HAITH, 2005. Natural recovery reduces impact of the 1970 ARROW oil spill. Pages 4999-5003 in 2005 International Oil Spill Conference: prevention, preparedness, response, and restoration, Miami Beach, Florida, May 15-19, 2005 .

In 1970 the tanker ARROW ran aground releasing 2,000 m3 of Bunker C crude oil along 300 km of Nova Scotia's coastline, of which only 10 % was subjected to cleanup, the rest was left to degrade naturally. Sediment and interstitial water collected in 1993 and 1997 from Black Duck Cove in Chedabucto Bay, a representative untreated site, showed that the remaining residual oil has undergone substantial biodegradation. The environmental significance of this intrinsic remediation process was assessed with a battery of microscale biotests: CYP1A and mixed function oxygenase induction in winter flounder, Amphipod Survival, Echinoid Fertilization, Grass Shrimp Embryo-Larval Toxicity, Microtox® Solid-Phase and 100 % Tests. While much oil remains in the sediment (426-12,744 ppm), results of the biotests show that it is of low toxicity and habitat recovery is evident from the level of benthic diversity.©2005 American Petroleum Institute

LEE, K., S.E. COBANLI, J. GAUTHIER, S. ST-PIERRE, G.H. TREMBLAY, G. WOHLGESCHAFFEN, 1999. Evaluating the addition of fine particles to enhance oil degradation. Pages 765-770 in Proceedings : 1999 International Oil Spill Conference (Beyond 2000, Balancing Perspectives), March 8-11, 1999, Seattle, Washington .

LEE, K., G.D. WOHLGESCHAFFEN, G.H. TREMBLAY, J.H. VANDERMEULEN, D.C. MOSSMAN, K.G. DOE, P.M. JACKMAN, J.E.H. WILSON, R.C. PRINCE, R.M. GARRETT, C.E. HAITH, 1999. Natural recovery reduces impact of the 1970 Arrow oil spill. Pages 1075-1078 in Proceedings : 1999 International Oil Spill Conference (Beyond 2000, Balancing Perspectives), March 8-11, 1999, Seattle, Washington .

LEE, K., G.D. WOHLGESCHAFFEN, G.H. TREMBLAY, J.H. VANDERMEULEN, D.C. MOSSMAN, K.G. DOE, P.M. JACKMAN, R.C. PRINCE, R.M. GARRETT, C.E. HAITH, 1999. Persistence, biodegradation and biological impact of Bunker C residues in Black Duck Cove, Nova Scotia. In Actes du colloque Vingt ans après l'Amoco Cadiz, Brest, France, October 15-17, 1998 .

LEE, K., G.D. WOHLGESCHAFFEN, G.H. TREMBLAY, J.H. VANDERMEULEN, D.C. MOSSMAN, K.G. DOE, P.M. JACKMAN, R.C. PRINCE, R.M. GARRETT, C.E. HAITH, 1999. Persistance, biodégradation et impacts biologiques des résidus de Bunker C à Black Duck Cove, Nouvelle-Écosse. In Actes du colloque Vingt ans après l'Amoco Cadiz, Brest, France, October 15-17, 1998 .

LEE, K., G.D. WOHLGESCHAFFEN, G.H. TREMBLAY, J.H. VANDERMEULEN, D.C. MOSSMAN, K.G. DOE, P.M. JACKMAN, R.C. PRINCE, R.M. GARRETT, C.E. HAITH, 1998. Residual hydrocarbon toxicity in sediments impacted by the 1970 Arrow spill. Pages 485-504 in Proceedings : Twenty-first Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program Technical Seminar, June 10 to 12, 1998, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada .