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Bibliography of the Maurice Lamontagne Institute

George HORONOWITSCH

SMITH, T.G., G. HORONOWITSCH, 1987. Phoques communs dans les Lacs des Loups Marins et le bassin hydrographique de l'est de la Baie d'Hudson. Rapp. tech. can. sci. halieut. aquat., 1536, 17 p .

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aerial surveys were flown in the Lacs des Loups Marins area during the period 18 February to 6 March 1986. We located 12 sites where significant open water existed in the lakes' system. No seals (Phoca vitulina) were seen hauled-out at any of these sites, but numerous other tracks were observed. We camped at one site midway along the narrows of Lacs des Loups Marins on 3-4 March. There we made one observation of a harbour seal swimming in an area of open water approximately 150 x 700 m in extent. Under-ice shoreline shelters caused by lowered water levels in the winter might provide important resting sites for seals, protecting them from low temperatures and predators. It is impossible at present to either estimate the number of seals or ascertain whether the population in Lacs des Loups Marins is a closed one. The sub-specific status of the seals is by no means definite. Radio-telemetry studies might be the best approach for future investigations.

SMITH, T.G., G. HORONOWITSCH, 1987. Harbour seals in the Lac des Loups Marins and eastern Hudson Bay drainage. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 1536, 17 p .

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Aerial surveys were flown in the Lacs des Loups Marins area during the period 18 February to 6 March 1986. We located 12 sites where significant open water existed in the lakes' system. No seals (Phoca vitulina) were seen hauled-out at any of these sites, but numerous other tracks were observed. We camped at one site midway along the narrows of Lacs des Loups Marins on 3 -4  March. There we made one observation of a harbour seal swimming in an area of open water approximately 150 x 700 m in extent. Under-ice shoreline shelters caused by lowered water levels in the winter might provide important resting sites for seals, protecting them from low temperatures and predators. It is impossible at present to either estimate the number of seals or ascertain whether the population in Lacs des Loups Marins is a closed one. The sub-specific status of the seals is by no means definite. Radio-telemetry studies might be the best approach for future investigations.