Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.

Bibliography of the Maurice Lamontagne Institute

Marie-Hélène GENDRON

GRÉGOIRE, F., W. BARRY, J.-J. BARRY, J. BARRY, J.-L. BEAULIEU, M.-H. GENDRON, 2011. West coast of Newfoundland Capelin (Mallotus villosus M.) and Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus harengus L.) larval survey, part 8 : abundance estimates and marine community analyses of the data collected in partnership with the industry (Barry Group) in july 2008. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 2954, 65 p .

Click to see all the text

In partnership with the Barry Group in Corner Brook, a larval survey was conducted on the west coast of Newfoundland in July 2008 to measure the abundance and to describe the spatial distribution of eggs and larvae of the main fish species encountered. In the survey, eggs were most abundant in the CYT group (Cunner [Tautogolabrus adspersus] and Yellowtail Flounder [Limanda ferruginea]), followed by Atlantic Mackerel (Scomber Scombrus) eggs and eggs from the CHW group (Cod [Gadus morhua], Haddock [Melanogrammus aeglefinus], and witch Flounder [Glyptocephalus cynoglossus]) and the H4B group (Hake [Urophycis spp.], Fourbeard Rockling [Enchelyopus cimbrius], and American Butterfish [Peprilus triacanthus]). Among the larvae collected, the most abundant species were Capelin (Mallotus villosus), Cunner, Radiated Shanny (Ulvaria subbifurcata), Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus), and Atlantic Mackerel. Compared to the survey conducted in the same area in 2007, and omitting St. George’s Bay, the 2008 survey was characterized by a larger number of Atlantic Mackerel eggs and Capelin and Atlantic Herring larvae and a decrease in cod and righteye flounder larvae. Generalized additive models (GAM) have shown that the abundance of eggs and larvae of the primary species sampled could be described using a smoothing function based on longitude, latitude, their interaction, water temperature, and the abundance of Atlantic Mackerel eggs for larvae from this same species. From abundance measurements of all sampled larvae, cluster and ordination analyses revealed the presence of a spatial structure within the larval community. This was mainly characterized by Capelin, Cunner, and Atlantic Herring.

GRÉGOIRE, F., W. BARRY, J.-J. BARRY, J. BARRY, C. LÉVESQUE, J.-L. BEAULIEU, M.-H. GENDRON, 2011. West coast of Newfoundland Capelin (Mallotus villosus M.) and Atlantic Herring (Clupea harendus harengus L.) larval survey, part 7 : description of the data collected in partnership with the industry (Barry Group) in July 2008. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 1235, 33 p .

Click to see all the text

In partnership with the Barry Group, a larval survey was conducted on the west coast of Newfoundland from 16 to 18 July 2008 to measure the abundance of fish eggs and larvae sampled with plankton nets. A second objective was to describe the spatial distribution of fish larvae including those from two significant commercial species, Capelin (Mallotus villosus) and Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus harengus). The two most abundant egg groups were the CYT group (Cunner [Tautogolabrus adspersus] and Yellowtail Flounder [Limanda ferruginea]) and the CHW group (Cod [Gadus morhua], Haddock [Melanogrammus aeglefinus], and witch Flounder (Glyptocephalus cynoglossus]). In addition, Atlantic Mackerel (Scomber scombrus) eggs were collected at all stations. Of the 16 larva species identified, the most abundant were capelin and cunner, followed by Radiated Shanny (Ulvaria subbifurcata), Atlantic Herring, Fourbeard Rockling (Enchelyopus cimbrius) and Atlantic Mackerel. Temperature and salinity profiles according to depth were made at each station. All biological and oceanographic data were collected and compiled and are presented in the tables, figures, and appendices in this document. These data will be analyzed and published in a forthcoming report.

GRÉGOIRE, F., W. BARRY, J. BARRY, C. LÉVESQUE, J.-L. BEAULIEU, M.-H. GENDRON, 2011. West coast of Newfoundland Capelin (Mallotus villosus M.) and Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus harengus L.) larval survey, part 6 : abundance estimates and marine community analyses of the data collected in partnership with the industry (Barry Group) in July 2007. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 2953, 65 p .

Click to see all the text

In partnership with the Barry Group in Corner Brook, a larval survey was conducted on the west coast of Newfoundland in July 2007 to measure the abundance and to describe the spatial distribution of eggs and larvae of fish species sampled, two of which were commercially significant, capelin (Mallosus villosus) and Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus harengus). The most abundant eggs were from the CYT (cunner [Tautogolabrus adspersus] and yellowtail flounder [Limanda ferruginea]), CHW (cod [Gadus morhua], haddock [Melanogrammus aeglefinus], and witch flounder [Glyptocephalus cynoglossus]), and H4B (hake [Urophycis spp.], fourbeard rockling [Enchelyopus cimbrius], and American butterfish [Peprilus triacanthus]) groups. Among the larvae collected, the most abundant species were cunner, flounder (Pleuronectidae), and Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) followed by capelin, fourbeard rockling, radiated shanny (Ulvaria subbifurcata), cod, and Atlantic herring. Compared to the survey conducted in 2005, and omitting St. George’s Bay, the 2007 survey was characterized by a smaller number of Atlantic mackerel and capelin eggs and larvae. Egg groups CYT, CHW, and H4B, were also less abundant. The only increases in abundance were measured for windowpane (Scophthalmus aquosus) eggs, as well as radiated shanny, redfish (Sebastes spp.), sand lance (Ammodytes spp.), and snailfish (Liparis spp.) larvae. Generalized additive models (GAM) have shown that the abundance of eggs and larvae of most species sampled could be described using a smoothing function based on the interaction between the longitude and latitude of the stations. The abundance of Atlantic mackerel eggs and cod larvae have also been described by a second function based on water temperature. Finally, a last function based on the abundance of Atlantic mackerel eggs helped describe the abundance of larvae of this species. From abundance measurements of all sampled larvae, cluster and ordination analyses revealed the presence of a well-defined spatial structure within the larval community. This was mainly characterized by cunner and Flounder.

LAROCQUE, R., J-D. DUTIL, S. PROULX, M. THORNE, P.-M. SCALLON-CHOUINARD, M.-H. GENDRON, J. PLOURDE, T. SCHMITT, 2010. Contribution à la description de l'habitat des loups de mer (Anarhichas spp.) près de la péninsule gaspésienne par vidéo remorquée et relevés acoustiques multifaisceaux. Rapp. tech. can. sci. halieut. aquat., 2902, 51 p .

Click to see all the text

This report presents the results of several initiatives that examine the potential habitat of wolffish (Anarhichas spp.) in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and in particular near the Gaspé peninsula. The habitat features were examined at different spatial scales: by towed video, multibeam acoustic surveys and an examination of historical catch data. High-resolution bathymetry and backscatter coupled with information extracted from video allowed for a detailed description of environments known to be used by wolfish. Features believed to be favourable to wolfish were identified on both survey sites, including shelters and glacial scours. The resulting information is presented within the attached multimedia DVD-ROM. The complimentary nature of these methods and the management implications for a species at risk are discussed.

GRÉGOIRE, F., W. BARRY, J. BARRY, C. LÉVESQUE, J.-L. BEAULIEU, M.-H. GENDRON, 2009. West coast of Newfoundland Capelin (Mallotus villosus M.) and Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus harengus L.) larval survey, part 4 : abundance estimates and marine community analyses of the data collected in partnership with the industry (Barry Group) in July 2005. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 2837, 51 p .

Click to see all the text

In partnership with the Barry Group in Corner Brook, a larval survey was conducted on the west coast of Newfoundland in July 2005. The survey’s two principal objectives were to describe the spatial distribution and measure the abundance of eggs and larvae of the principal fish species occurring in the study area. The most abundant eggs belonged to the CYT group (cunner [Tautogolabrus adspersus] and yellowtail flounder [Limanda ferruginea]) followed by the H4B group (hake [Urophycis spp.], fourbeard rockling [Enchelyopus cimbrus] and butterfish [Peprilus triacanthius]) and the CHW group (Atlantic cod [Gadus morhua], haddock [Melanogrammus aeglefinus] and witch flounder [Glyptocephalus cynoglossus]). Among the larvae collected, the most abundant species were cunner, capelin (Mallotus villosus), fourbeard rockling and blenny (Lumpenus spp.) followed by righteye flounder (Pleuronectidae), Atlantic cod, Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) and windowpane flounder (Scophthalmus aquosus). Compared with the survey conducted in the same area in 2004, the 2005 survey was characterized by a significant drop in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) larvae and an increase of capelin and Atlantic mackerel larvae. Cluster and ordination analyses revealed the presence of a structure within the larval community. Groups of stations were defined and characterized mostly by the occurrence of cunner and capelin. Significant temperature and salinity differences were recorded between these groups. However, these differences were not large enough to show a link between the specific larval composition for each group of stations and these two environmental variables.

GRÉGOIRE, F., C. LÉVESQUE, J.-L. BEAULIEU, M.-H. GENDRON, 2009. Pêche commerciale et biologie du maquereau bleu (Scomber scombrus L.) dans les sous-régions 3 et 4 de l’OPANO en 2007 ; Commercial fishery and biology of the Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) in NAFO Subareas 3 and 4 in 2007. MPO, Secrétariat canadien de consultation scientifique, Document de recherche ; DFO, Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat, Research Document, 2009/025, 166 p .

Click to see all the text

In 2007, preliminary landings of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) in the Northwest Atlantic totalled 75,863 t, which represents a decrease of 34,423 t from 2006 and 20,475 t from 2005. In eastern Canada, 50,578 t were landed with 44,032 t (87 %) in Newfoundland alone. The actual landings made in Canadian waters should be higher because fishery data from certain provinces were not all accounted for at the time of the assessment. In 2007, American landings totalled 25,285 t, a decrease of 31,352 t compared with 2006 and 15,732 t with 2005. The sharing of the resource based on historical landings and including the catches made by foreign vessels in American and Canadian waters would total 74 % in favour of the United States if this calculation were based on total landings made between 1960 and 2007. This proportion would be 51 % if the calculation were based on the average annual landings proportion of each country. When only considering domestic American and Canadian landings, these values would total 63 % and 70 % respectively in favour of Canada. In 2007, most of the landings off the west coast of Newfoundland were from unit areas 4Rb, 4Rc and 4Rd with respective totals of 7,100 t, 8,094 t and 8,039 t. On the east coast of Newfoundland, the most important landings were from unit areas 3Kh, 3Ki, 3La and 3Lb with respective values of 6,131 t, 1,483 t, 4,687 t and 5,511 t. Since the early 2000s, Canadian landings have been greatly dominated by fish from the 1999 year-class. Between 2000 and 2004, fish from this year-class have accounted for between 45 % and 77 % of all catches in numbers, which had not been observed since the late 1960s. Nevertheless, the relative significance of this year-class dropped sharply beginning in 2005 in favour of the 2003 year-class that accounted for 40 % of the 2007 landings. The strong 1999 year-class, which was responsible for landings of more than 150,000 t since 2000, is no longer an important contributor to the fishery or to the spawning stock. The strength of the year-classes since 1999 does not appear to be strong. Catches in the order of 50,000 t in recent years have been supported by this strong year-class. It is uncertain that catches of that level can be realized in the years to come with the year-classes presently available to the fishery.

GRÉGOIRE, F., M.-H. GENDRON, 2009. La pêche aux poissons pélagiques dans le nord du golfe du Saint-Laurent (divisions 4R et 4S de l’OPANO) entre 1995 et 2007. Rapp. can. ind. sci. halieut. aquat., 283, 36 p .

Click to see all the text

Significant catches of pelagic fish are made every year in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. Between 1995 and 2007, 413,000t of capelin (Mallotus villosus), Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus harengus) and Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) were landed with nearly 405,000t on the west coast of Newfoundland (NAFO Division 4R). Atlantic herring was the most heavily exploited species followed by Atlantic mackerel and capelin with respective average annual landings of 15,190t, 10,653t and 5,927t. Atlantic herring and capelin landings have been relatively stable from one year to the next. However, a sharp increase in Atlantic mackerel landings has been observed since 2000. The purse seine, gillnet and trap are the principal fishing gear used for catching pelagic fish. The "tuck" seine, which has been used since 2005, is now the second most important gear on the west coast of Newfoundland for Atlantic herring and Atlantic mackerel. The capelin and Atlantic herring fisheries (spring component) occur during the spring spawning season. The Atlantic mackerel and Atlantic herring fisheries (fall component), generally occur towards the end of the summer during the spawning season (fall herring) and in the fall when they gather in schools. Because of the vastness of the Quebec North Shore territory (NAFO Division 4S), landings of pelagic fish could be higher. However, any increase in the fishing effort should include close monitoring because the abundance, biology, range and migration of these species are not well known.

GRÉGOIRE, F., W. BARRY, J. BARRY, O. GREGAN, C. LÉVESQUE, J.-L. BEAULIEU, M.-H. GENDRON, 2008. Évaluation de la biomasse reproductrice de maquereau bleu (Scomber scombrus L.) à partir des données des relevés d’ichtyoplancton réalisés sur la côte ouest de Terre-Neuve en 2004 et 2005 ; Assessment of the Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) spawning stock biomass from the data of the ichthyoplankton surveys made on the west coast of Newfoundland in 2004 and 2005. MPO, Secrétariat canadien de consultation scientifique, Document de recherche ; DFO, Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat, Research Document, 2008/039, 29 p .

Click to see all the text

Ichthyoplankton surveys for describing distribution and calculating larvae abundance for pelagic fish were conducted on the west coast of in July 2004 and 2005. Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) larvae and eggs were collected at most of the stations sampled. Egg densities by station were converted in daily and total production and in spawning biomass according to the same analytical approach used for the abundance surveys conducted annually in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence In 2004 and 2005, spawning biomasses were estimated respectively at 1,466 t and 5,692 t. These biomasses were only associated with the sampled area and the portion of the population that was spawning at the time of the surveys.

GRÉGOIRE, F., W. BARRY, J. BARRY, C. LEVESQUES, J.-L. BEAULIEU, M.-H. GENDRON, 2008. West coast of Newfoundland capelin (Mallotus villosus M.) and Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus harengus L.) larval survey. Part 5, Description of the data collected in partnership with the industry (Barry Group) in July 2007. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 1205, 31 p .

Click to see all the text

In partnership with the Barry Group in Comer Brook, a larval survey was conducted on the west coast of Newfoundland from July 18 to 21, 2007. Eggs and larvae of several ofspecies offish were found at all sampled stations. The two most abundant groups of eggs were CYT (cunner [Tautogolabrus adspersus] and yellowtail flounder [Limanda ferruginea]) and CHW (cod [Gadus morhua], haddock [Melanogrammus aeglefinus], and witch flounder [Glyptocephalus cynoglossus]). Mackerel eggs (Scomber scombrus) were found at most of the stations. Of the thirteen species of larvae identified, the most abundant were those of cunner, righteye flounder (Pleuronectidae) mackerel, fourbeard rockling (Enchelyopus cimbrus), and capelin (Mallotus villosus). Depth-based profiles of water temperature and salinity were made for each station. All the biological and oceanographic data collected during the survey were compiled and are presented in the tables, figures, and appendices found in this document. These data will be analyzed and published in a forthcoming report

LAROCQUE, R., M.-H. GENDRON, J.-D. DUTIL, 2008. A survey of wolffish (Anarhichas spp.) and wolffish habitat in Les Méchins, Quebec. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 2786, 35 p .

Click to see all the text

Atlantic wolffish (Anarhichas lupus) and spotted wolffish (A. minor) are respectively listed as a species of special concern and as a threatened species under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) in Canada. The objectives of this work were to gather information on a near-shore wolffish population in the St. Lawrence estuary in eastern Quebec, to evaluate methods related to wolffish studies, and to assess the feasibility of wolffish release and in situ monitoring. The local A. lupus distribution was found to be vertically limited by temperature, with wolffish avoiding the surface layer affected by the Gaspé Current. The numbers of fish on the deeper reefs was relatively constant over the two years of the study, with many specimens spending long periods in the same shelters. Winter survival following a fish-release experiment was confirmed by scuba observations. Migration may explain the apparent low success rate of the release effort. Fish pairings and egg masses were observed, and this led to an evaluation of the role of coastal reefs in the life history of Anarhichas spp. A non-intrusive method for measuring fish was used by scuba divers and is described. The use of a high-resolution multibeam sonar survey as a tool for scuba divers and habitat-related work is also discussed.

GRÉGOIRE, F., C. LÉVESQUE, J.-L. BEAULIEU, C. MÉTHOT, M.-H. GENDRON, 2007. Résultats du relevé des œufs de maquereau bleu (Scomber scombrus L.) réalisé dans le sud du golfe du Saint-Laurent en 2006 ; Results of the Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) egg survey conducted in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence in 2006. MPO, Secrétariat canadien de consultation scientifique, Document de recherche ; DFO, Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat, Research Document, 2007/073, 76 p .

Click to see all the text

A survey for assessing the spawning biomass of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) by egg sampling was conducted in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence between June 28th and July 8th, 2006. Some very low egg abundance, less than 10 eggs/m2, was recorded at nearly 75 % of the sampled stations. The highest abundance was recorded at stations located west of the Magdalen Islands. These stations were associated to water temperatures (0-10 m layer) varying between 9.3 °C and 12.3 °C. The mean egg production for the entire sampled area was calculated at 7.4 eggs/m2, and total production at 5.12 x 1011 eggs. A spawning biomass of 54,133 t was associated with this egg production, which represented the lowest recorded value since 1979. The 2006 survey was conducted towards the end of the spawning season as indicated by the daily egg production curve, the high water temperatures, between 9.3 °C and 16.7 °C, and the presence of larvae at just about every station. When considering these results, the assessed biomass for 2006 is associated to the portion of the stock that reproduced at the very end of the spawning season rather than the entire stock. In order to improve the mackerel abundance assessment, it is suggested that the survey be conducted at more appropriate dates. The 2006 survey could not be conducted earlier due to a conflict in time management for vessels. It is also suggested that the survey cover the Scotian Shelf due to the recent changes in mackerel migration routes.

GRÉGOIRE, F., C. LÉVESQUE, J.-L. BEAULIEU, C. MÉTHOT, M.-H. GENDRON, 2007. Pêche et biologie du maquereau bleu (Scomber scombrus L.) des sous-régions 3 et 4 de l’OPANO en 2006 ; Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.)fishery and biology for NAFO Subareas 3 and 4 in 2006. MPO, Secrétariat canadien de consultation scientifique, Document de recherche ; DFO, Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat, Research Document, 2007/067, 136 p .

Click to see all the text

In 2006, preliminary landings of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) in the Northwest Atlantic totalled 96,272 t, which represents a decrease of 66 t from 2005 and 12,547 t from 2004. In eastern Canada, 38,155 t were landed, with 34,884 t in Newfoundland alone. The actual landings made in Canadian waters in 2006 should be higher because fishery data from New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia were not all accounted for at the time of the assessment. In 2006, American landings totalled 58,117 t, an increase of 17,100 t compared with 2005. By considering the catches made by foreign vessels in American and Canadian waters, the sharing of the resource between both countries would total 75 % in favour of the United States if this calculation was based on total landings made between 1960 and 2005, and 52 % based on the average annual landings proportion of each country. When only considering domestic American and Canadian landings, these values would total 64 % and 70 % respectively in favour of Canada. Most of the landings off the west coast of Newfoundland were from unit areas 4Rd, 4Rb and 4Rc with respective totals of 8,159 t, 3,139 t and 2,617 t. On the east coast of Newfoundland, the most important landings were from unit areas 3Kh, 3Lb and 3Kd with respective values of 11,705 t, 3,265 t and 3,243 t. The other significant unit areas, with over 1,000 t each, were 3La on the east coast of Newfoundland and 4Tf in the Magdalen Islands with 1,912 t and 1,046 t respectively. Since the early 2000s, Canadian landings have been greatly dominated by fish from the 1999 year-class. Between 2001 and 2004, fish from this year-class have accounted for between 45 % and 77 % of all catches in numbers, which had not been observed since the late 1960s. Nevertheless, the relative significance of this year-class has dropped sharply in 2005 and 2006 in favour of the 2003 year-class. From 2002 to 2003, annual landings attributed to the 1999 year-class varied from 4,927 t to 35,970 t. They decreased from 30,792 t and 24,805 t in 2004 and 2005 to only 6,429 t in 2006. Although there are still uncertainties associated with fishery statistics, it appears that the dominant 1999 year-class no longer contributes very much to the fishery or to the reproductive stock. Therefore, total landings in 2007 are not likely to exceed that of recent years and the TAC, which far exceeds the highest recorded landings, should be brought back down to 50,000 t. However, it is highly likely that landings of this magnitude will not be sustainable if post-1999 year-classes are of only average abundance.