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Bibliography of the Maurice Lamontagne Institute

E. Gary ATKINSON

ATKINSON, E.G., J.A. PERCY, 1992. Diet comparison among demersal marine fish from the Canadian Arctic. Polar Biol., 11: 567-573 .

ATKINSON, E.G., J.A. PERCY, 1991. Stomach content analysis of marine benthic fish from Arctic Canada. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 840, 31 p .

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Tabulations are provided of the diets of 12 species of demersal marine fish from various locations in the Canadian Arctic, comprising a grand total of 267 prey species, mainly invertebrates. The total number of prey species taken by a single fish species ranged from 9 to 91, and the mean number per stomach from 2.0 to 9.4. The most important prey were Crustacea, most frequently epibenthic or planktonic species; Polychaeta, mainly the larger species; and Mollusca, notably the cropped siphons of Macoma calcarea. Generally, only a few species comprised the bulk of the food. Most of the fish had a predominantly benthic or epibenthic diet, a notable exception being Triglops pingeli which ate zooplankton almost exclusively at the three sites from which it was collected. To a lesser extent, Triglops murrayi, Icelus spatula and Liparis gibbus also fed planktonically.

REEVES, R.R., E.G. ATKINSON, J. BOULVA, A. GASTON, J. GREEN, P. LAROUCHE, D. MUDRY, J. PERCY, T.G. SMITH, 1990. Report of marine birds and mammals working group. Pages 33-38 in J.A. Percy (ed.). Proceedings of a workshop : Marine Ecosystem Studies in Hudson Strait, November 9-10, 1989, Montréal, Québec. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans (Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 1770) .

ATKINSON, E.G., J.W. WACASEY, 1989. Benthic invertebrates collected from Hudson Strait, Foxe Channel and Foxe Basin, Canada, 1949 to 1970. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 746, 98 p .

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Tabulations of benthic invertebrates are provided for 81 stations sampled in the Hudson Strait-Foxe Basin area by the Eastern Arctic Investigations of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada, now the Arctic Biological Station of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, between 1949 and 1970. A total of 541 species, mostly macrobenthic (> 1 mm), are represented in the collections.

ATKINSON, E.G., J.W. WACASEY, 1989. Benthic invertebrates collected from the western Canadian Arctic, 1951 to 1985. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 745, 132 p .

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Tabulations of benthic invertebrates are provided for a total of 159 stations sampled in the Beaufort Sea-Amundsen Gulf and Bathurst Inlet-Dease Strait areas by the Arctic Unit of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada, now the Arctic Biological Station of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, between 1951 and 1965. A total of 434 species are listed. Density, biomass and caloric equivalents are provided for some stations.

ATKINSON, E.G., J.W. WACASEY, 1989. Benthic invertebrates collected from Hudson Bay, Canada, 1953 to 1965. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 744, 121 p .

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Tabulations of benthic invertebrates are provided for 177 stations sampled in Hudson Bay between 1953 and 1965. Most of the collections were made by the Eastern Arctic Investigations of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada, now the Arctic Biological Station of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. A total of 479 species, mostly macrobenthic (> 1 mm), are represented in the collections.

ATKINSON, E.G., J.W. WACASEY, 1987. Sedimentation in Arctic Canada : particulate organic carbon flux to a shallow marine benthic community in Frobisher Bay. Polar Biol., 8: 3-7 .

Sediment traps designed and constructed by the authors were deployed on the bottom during short periods of time at a depth of 33 m in upper Frobisher Bay. When the results were compared with data obtained from a trap set at the compensation depth (20 m), resuspension of particulate organic carbon was estimated at 25 % of the sediment. The annual sedimentation cycle was typified by consistently low winter rates, with variable maximum rates and loads occurring in August following the peak of primary production in the water column. Mean annual sediment flux was found to be 26 g C m-2y-1, representing 31 - 53% of the range of estimates of carbon fixed in total annual primary production. Relating this to estimated zoobenthic production indicated a benthic conversion efficiency of 53%, not accounting for loss to sediment of benthic primary production. Increased sedimentation following the spring bloom in August appears to stimulate reproduction in some benthic species.copy;1987 Springer-Verlag

WACASEY, J.W., E.G. ATKINSON, 1987. Energy values of marine benthic invertebrates from the Canadian Arctic. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser., 39: 243-250 .

WACASEY, J.W., E.G. ATKINSON, 1987. Benthic invertebrates collected from Ungava Bay, Canada, 1947-1951. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 1537, 68 p .

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The Eastern Arctic Investigations of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada made extensive collections of marine invertebrates in Ungava Bay, between 1947 and 1951. Benthic invertebrates are tabulated for 77 of the 153 stations that were occupied. The tabulations were derived from published reports of major taxa and from identitication of specimens of minor taxa and previously unsorted collections.The 411 identified species are mostly macrobenthos (>1 mm). This extensive survey provides information about the distribution and abundance of species and reveals that the bottom communities are diverse, usually having over 100 species. The taxa with the largest number of species are Polychaeta, Amphipoda, Ascidiacea, Hydrozoa, Ectoprocta, Gastropoda and Pelecypoda. Collections came from depths ranging from the shoreline to 225 m, but only a few were from more than 100 m. Twenty-five intertidal stations have a characteristic fauna that is low in diversity. Ungava Bay, located in an area of well mixed waters, has a diverse benthic fauna with many widespread species and may be one of the more productive areas of northern Canada.